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» LMB guest-blogs at EOS Books from Quotulatiousness
Lois McMaster Bujuld, author of the "Vorkosigan" SF series and the "Chalion" fantasy series, is guest-blogging this week at the EOS Books blog. In her first posting today, she talks about some of the differences between her writing habits and... [Read More]

Comments

Laura Gallagher

How very interesting. Thanks for the insight into your writing process. I do think, having read the book, that it would be just fascinating to get a look at that outline!

Agnès Charrel-Berthillier

Hmmm... Take pictures of those notebook pages with all the arrows and big Xs, and post them?

Not quite what people asked for, but could provide endless entertainment amongst readers as they argue back and forth about the one true meaning of that penciled squiggle.

Carol Gray-Ricci

For the first time, I understand what you have previously said about your writing methods, and why you don't have to re-write every scene several times. You do it in your head before you sit down at the computer, and it comes out polished. (Not that it matters much how you do it, the fact that it is done, and done so well, is the important thing to the reader)

Elizabeth McCoy

I am so, so, so utterly glad that there are authors who produce stuff from other means than the "traditional" outline.

(Do you think the character type of Dag's grandfather (so slain before he appeared!) would ever surface again in some other story?)

Irene Delse

Oh, yes! Give us the penciled squiggle ;-)

Anyway, this is fascinating stuff. Thanks for sharing, Lois. I'm impressed by the insight this gives into the author's thinking-and-writing process. Even more so because I'm another of the "no traditional outline" writers! So, no need to feel at disadvantage because you don't write it all in advance, folks! Your best-loved writer works like that too ;-)

M. Haller Yamada

(-: Wonderful view on the inside. The binder idea is great -- I'd always imagined that one *did* hold the whole thing in one's head until it exploded on the paper -- that's what I do with short stories. Or a simple outline. I think fiction background must have a lot in common with non-fiction backgrounding -- just you have to make up all your facts in fiction (-:.

Eric Oppen

Thank you for your kindness in letting your fans have a look at your creative process!

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